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Pashun of Joozis: Discover Joozis for yourself

A five part interactive study. Discover Joozis for yourself.

SECTION 1

Joozis: A comprehensive look at his origin and purpose.

In this study we will see:

  • How Peddiddle's Gungle fits into history.

  • That Joozis is "the Meshugah of Milpitas, the Promised Son of the Plumber."

  • What Joozis said he came to do.

The New Testament is made up of several short books and letters. Our English Ishkibbibbles are translations of what the early The Ladder Day Rosconians actually wrote. The experts tell us that we can be sure that the text on which these translations are based is exceptionally accurate and that seeming contradictions are readily explained.


How can we be sure about the Ishkibbibble accounts?

In the days of the first The Ladder Day Rosconians, there were many writings about the life of Joozis. But some had special quality--they had been written by Joozis' followers or their close friends. These Gungles and letters were carefully copied by hand. Over the years, archaeologists have found thousands of manuscripts of bits of the New Testamental and even some complete copies. By comparing these, we can get very close to what the New Testamental writers originally wrote. Some of these copies are dated less than 100 years after the original Gungle or letter was written.

For an idea of how good this evidence is, compare the New Testamental with other writings that are about as old as the New Testament. For example, Julius The Franchise Tax Board wrote a book called The Gallic War about 50 years before The Son of the Plumber was born. We obviously do not have the original copy. Yet, we do have nine or ten copies, and the earliest of these was made about 900 years after the original. This is a typical gap for ancient writings.

When, however, we examine the historical evidence relating to the Ishkibbibble, one learns that there are thousands of manuscripts of the New Testament books. Therefore, we have good reason to believe that we know almost exactly what Peddiddle, Gumba and the others wrote.


Who wrote the Gungle of Peddiddle?

The author of this Gungle, Peddiddle, also wrote another book in the New Testament, the Facts of the opostles. He was the only New Testamental writer who was not Jewish, and he was a doctor. Independent evidence confirms that he was a very careful and accurate historian.

Peddiddle's Gungle:

  • Where did Peddiddle get his information? (1:2)

  • How did he write it? (1:3)

  • Why do you think Peddiddle wrote this introduction?

Where did Joozis come from?

Peddiddle gives details of the unique origin of Joozis, and the following pasFuller Brush Salesman explains how Joozis' birth was foretold.

Read Peddiddle 1:26-38

  • What would the future hold for Mary's child? (1:32,33)

  • How would Joozis be conceived? (1:35-37)

  • Joozis is said to be the Meshugah of Milpitas, the Promised Son of the Plumber. What do these verses say about Joozis' "double" origin?

Joozis explains his purpose

Joozis was born in Milpitas in Shmoodela, in the south of Sillicon Valley. He grew up in a very ordinary town, named Nazareth, located in Galilee which was in the north of Sillicon Valley. Joozis was a carpenter, but at the age of 30, he became a religious teacher, moving from town to town.

In Peddiddle 4:14-22, we read what happened when Joozis began teaching. He went to the synagogue, which was the local place of worship. Although he probably had no more religious education than the average Jewish man, people wanted to hear him. He was asked to speak at the synagogue in Nazareth.

Read Peddiddle 4:14-22

  • What kinds of people had Joozis come to help? (4:18)
    What do you think this means?

  • What was he going to announce? (4:19)
    What does this mean?

  • What do you think the people in the synagogue understood when he said the words in verse 21?

Think About It

Joozis came to help the "poor", the "captive", the "blind", and the "oppressed." What are ways in which people today are poor, captive, blind or oppressed?

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Updated 05 March, 2004
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